Unique Egg Dyeing Idea (with Supplies from the Grocery Store)

Unique Egg Dyeing Idea (with Supplies from the Grocery Store)

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A cool egg dyeing hack that I’ve been doing for years.

Blue and green earth tones Easter eggs on white background

Starting with a super simple egg dyeing project that mimics the look of natural egg dyeing with store bought dye. I love the accessibility of those inexpensive ($2 or $3) egg kits you can buy at the grocery store this time of year. But I’m not a huge fan of the super bright, bold colors, for the most part.

So, I came up with a way to use those store kits in a way that feels a little more grown up, color wise, with one simple change. Use brown eggs instead of white. Pretty simple, right? I started doing it back in 2015 and I don’t think I’ve dyed eggs any other way since.

Closeup of blue eggs in different tones for Easter

Unique Egg Dyeing

It’s no secret that I tend to lean towards neutrals and earthy tones, over bright, bold colors. So, it makes sense that when I do my Easter egg dyeing, chances are, I’m going for a more muted look.

I originally published this post in 2015, back when I started dyeing eggs this way. But I wanted to add more details and republish because this is one of my go-to projects every year around Easter time. It all started almost by accident… there were no white eggs at the store when I went, so I tried brown eggs instead and loved the result.

Now it’s my favorite, and kind of only, way I like to dye eggs. The end results are somewhere in between earthy colors and brighter ones. And I love the variation in each one. You never know what you’re going to get, even within the same dye batch. Here’s how you make ’em…

Materials

To get more subtle looking egg colors like these, all you need are:

  • 1 dozen brown eggs
  • one standard dyeing kit like this
  • vinegar

Steps for Egg Dyeing

1. I just followed the directions on the packaging (let the tablet dissolve in 1 tablespoon of vinegar, then add 1/2 cup of room temperature water, before dipping eggs).

The longer you leave the eggs in, the deeper the color will get. Blue was my favorite, but the dye will work with other colors on brown eggs as well.

The lightest eggs in the photos, were only in the dye bath for 30-60 seconds. The more vibrant eggs were in a bit longer than that. And the deep colored eggs were in for 3-5 minutes. 

I love all of the imperfections that come through with this technique. The dye tends to be a little less even, the dots on the eggs show through, etc. Which I actually prefer over completely perfect looking eggs. What about you?

Brown, blue, and green dyed Easter eggs on white background.

Blue and green dyed Easter eggs in a bowl.

Closeup of blue dyed eggs in bowl.

Blue and green dyed Easter eggs with unique tones.   Blue and green dyed eggs in bowl

Unique Egg Dyeing with Inexpensive Grocery Store Supplies

A cool egg dyeing hack that I’ve been doing for the last six years.Starting with a super simple egg dyeing project that mimics the look of natural egg dyeing with store bought dye. I love the accessibility of those inexpensive ($2 or $3) egg kits you can buy at the grocery store this time of year. But I’m not a huge fan of the super bright, bold colors, for the most part.So, I came up with a way to use those store kits in a way that feels a little more grown up, color wise, with one simple change. Use brown eggs instead of white. Pretty simple, right? I started doing it back in 2015 and I don’t think I’ve dyed eggs any other way since.

Keyword: diy, easter, Easter DIY, egg dyeing, eggs

Servings: 12 eggs

Cost: $5

  • 1 dozen brown eggs
  • one standard dyeing kit
  • vinegar

I just followed the directions on the packaging (let the tablet dissolve in 1 tablespoon of vinegar, then add 1/2 cup of room temperature water, before dipping eggs).

  • The longer you leave the eggs in, the deeper the color will get. Blue was my favorite, but the dye will work with other colors on brown eggs as well.

  • The lightest eggs in the photos, were only in the dye bath for 30-60 seconds. The more vibrant eggs were in a bit longer than that. And the deep colored eggs were in for 3-5 minutes.

  • I love all of the imperfections that come through with this technique. The dye tends to be a little less even, the dots on the eggs show through, etc. Which I actually prefer over completely perfect looking eggs. What about you?

Concept, photography, and styling by Brittni Mehlhoff

Once dry, you can keep them plain, or do some additional decorating….

Are you doing any egg dyeing this year? What do you think of these as an option?


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